Corporation tax: Budget 2021 updates

The Chancellor said that this would be a Budget that “meets the moment” and, as most commentators predicted, it included corporation tax rises designed to start bringing down the debt the Government has incurred during the pandemic.

However, it was not all bad news for companies as some tax giveaways were also announced.

Corporation tax loss extension

Currently, companies can only carry back losses against profits arising in the previous year subject to certain restrictions in some cases. This first give-away applies to trade losses only arising in accounting periods ending between 1 April 2020 and 31 March 2021. These trade losses can be carried back three years, and will benefit those trading companies, that previously had healthy taxable profits but struggled with heavy losses during the pandemic.

Losses will be carried back to the latest accounting periods first, so for companies with a 31 May 2020 year end, losses are first carried back to 31 May 2019 and then any surplus trade losses can be carried back to the years ended 31 May 2018, and then 31 May 2017.

As you would expect, there are some restrictions:

  • There will be unlimited carry back to the preceding year. There will be a cap of £2 million on the total losses that can be carried back to the earlier periods. This cap applies to each accounting period within the extended carry back period.
  • There will be a requirement for groups that have companies with losses exceeding a de minimis of £200,000 trading losses to apportion the £2 million cap between companies.
  • Any repayment claims exceeding £200,000 will need to be made through an amended corporation tax return.

Tax Planning:

If your company has trade losses for this period, and has previously had taxable profits, consider whether you can increase the amount of tax you are repaid by utilising this relaxation to the loss carry back rules.

Capital allowance super deductions

This second give-away will benefit companies that plan to purchase certain types assets between 1 April 2021 and 31 March 2023.

Currently companies that incur capital expenditure may be able to obtain a tax deduction for these costs through the capital allowance scheme. The super deductions scheme adds a new first year allowance on certain types of new plant and machinery. The amount of the super deduction will be either 130% or 50% of the cost of the new asset, depending on the type of asset purchased. The 130% rate will apply to main pool additions, while the 50% to special rate pool additions.

Exclusions will apply to claims for super deductions, including:

  • Those already existing for increased allowances, including permanently discontinuing business activities, cars or plant or machinery used for leasing.
  • Expenditure on used and second-hand assets.
  • Expenditure on contracts entered into prior to Budget Day, 3 March 2021.

These super deductions can be claimed through your corporation tax return and will be available to reduce your taxable profits for the year in which they are claimed, and therefore will reduce the amount you need to pay to HMRC (see the corporation tax rates section for more information on why this might be great news!) Alternatively, they can be used to increase tax losses, which can be carried back to the previous accounting period (resulting in a tax repayment) or carried forward and utilised against future profits.

Tax Planning:

There will be additional rules concerning acquisitions on hire purchase contracts, disposals, accounting periods straddling 31 March 2023, among others. The Chiene + Tait capital allowance specialists are on hand to guide you through the process of claiming these new super deductions, as well as discussing your expenditure with you to ensure all claims are maximised.

Corporation tax rate rise

From 1 April 2023, companies with profits over £250,000, as well as ‘close investment holding companies’, will see their corporation tax rate rise from the current rate of 19% to 25%. There will also be the re-introduction of marginal relief for corporation tax, which will see the corporation tax rate of companies with profits between £50,000 and £250,000 rise to a hybrid rate between 25% and 19%. The tax rate will depend on these companies’ circumstances and HM Revenue & Customs have yet to announce full details on how these rates will be calculated.

The ‘profit thresholds’ for each corporation tax rate will be adjusted for shorter accounting periods, as well as for the number of associated companies. Whilst we do not yet have full details, these two caveats are likely to see the corporation tax rates rise hit a wider range of companies.

Tax Planning:

Companies paying their corporation tax liabilities in instalments will need to consider these rate changes early. The rules will be complex, and likely even more so for groups of companies.

Speak to our tax experts who are on hand to answer any questions you may have on the new corporation tax rates. We can help ensure that your company is claiming all tax reliefs it is eligible for, as well as advising on tax planning opportunities arising from your future plans.